Jason Ball's TechBytes

Technology & Venture Capital. Early stage venture capital news mixed with personal views and comments

Migrating your Photos to Dropbox

I’ve recently migrated my entire photo collection to Dropbox, and thought I’d share my thoughts on the experience.

First, photos are such precious parts of our lives, if you don’t have a backup plan for yours, you should count on losing them.

Second, I’ve lived in an Apple world since 1998, and have used every version of iPhoto produced, and finally moved over to Aperture because my library had grown to big, and I’d bought a DSLR, so wanted something more “professional” and responsive. Moving to Aperture was a mistake, and moving backwards to iPhoto was painful. I was ready to leave Apple’s solutions behind.

Third, setting Apple issues aside, I set out to find out if it was possible to have one single unified photo album that’s accessible from all my devices (for editing, maintenance and sharing)? The answer to this one came in the form of Dropbox, thanks to a few changes earlier this year.

Dropbox now pulls all images from inside your dropbox into a single view, aptly named, “Photos”. Photo management abilities are currently minimal – you can make and share Albums- but that’s plenty when your photos have been locked on a hard drive for years. The key for me is having ALL my photos in a file structure that I can easily navigate and manage. Dropbox provides that – and they’re backed up/duplicated on multiple machines. My photo management and photo sharing are now one and the same – this is a huge simplification. And it’s online, so handy tools like IFTTT can play nicely.

One unexpected key thing did happen during this process – my photo collection was cut in half size wise. Aperture uses Preview Photos, which duplicates your entire collection… After getting rid of those and some other trimming, I ended up with a much smaller total libarary size (which means it can grow significantly before hitting my storage threshold on Dropbox).

There are two tutorials that I used for the process (and it IS a process- one that’s taken a long time to complete): MacStories and SimplicityBliss . If this looks like too much pain; fear not. The latest experimental builds of dropbox have direct iPhoto import functionality, so it will be a simple process, and ready for prime time soon- no betas and no tinkering around to get all your photos into Dropbox. Last year, Dropbox acquired Snapjoy, with a view towards offering more photo management tools- which are now starting to see the light of day.

Filed under: Software

Investing in Wrapp

As part of an ongoing effort to be more transparent and open about venture and investing, I thought I’d set out a few reasons for why I led the effort behind Qualcomm Ventures’ recent investment into Wrapp (great interview with Carl where he discuses product and roadmap).

Looking back at my recent posts, The Three P’s of Venture Capital and Terminal Velocity, let’s look at how Wrapp fits those criteria:

1) People. The team has a vision, is passionate and can execute. I’ve known co-founder Andreas Ehn for many years, I’ve worked with Creandum at Videoplaza for the past 18 months, I knew Hjalmar Winbladh, Niklas Zenstromm and Reid Hoffman by reputation. All star line-up of team and investors.

2) Product. Simple, clean app with a razor sharp mobile focus. Easy to use and easy to like (really, who doesn’t like to get a gift?). While considering whether or not to invest, I talked to quite a few users who didn’t like the product- they LOVED the product. (I also talked to quite a few users that hated it. Everyone has an opinion.) I listened to the 1 million+ people that have downloaded the app, and the 15 Million gifts that have been sent.

3) Potential. Wrapp crosses the digital/physical divide- they can move people into stores, gyms, restaurants, etc and convert those feet into purchases. That is potentially huge. It’s still early days, but that conversion cycle is very compelling for brands and retailers. The market for gift cards is $110 Billion in the US alone- disrupting that market is a major opportunity. Marketing is a hard space to be in… and it’s not getting easier. Brands and companies need to engage with customers, and Wrapp offers them a great way to do that on a deeper basis.

4) Terminal Velocity. Subcategories were:

a) Lots of funding. $15M Series B. Check.

b) Office in the US. Wrapp is roughly split between Stockholm and San Francisco. Check.

c) Connections. Spotify, Microsoft, Skype, Linkedin,Creandum, Atomico, Greylock, American Express. Check.

d) Chutzpah. Being Swedish, not so much… they’re too understated, but there’s certainly a lot of charisma and charm.

Clearly, the company’s metrics and performance were very compelling as well – growth, retention, engagement, etc.

I could go through this exact same list for our investment in Waze back in 2010 and have very similar answers for each point above. Critically, Waze had hit the 1 million user mark; that’s a fundamental milestone that’s very indicative of a company’s success. Granted, you need many, many green lights to all work in your favor to get to a successful result, but the raw materials for success were there.

Also, I recognize this is for a Series B investment, so I’ll do the same exercise for my latest seed investment once that’s announced in a few weeks.

Filed under: Mobile, Venture Capital

Terminal Velocity

I posted my Three P’s of Venture Capital a few weeks back – Product, People and Potential.

There’s another component that I take into consideration as well: Terminal Velocity

The terminal velocity of a falling object is the velocity of the object when the sum of the drag force (Fd) and buoyancy equals the downward force of gravity (FG) acting on the object. Since the net force on the object is zero, the object has zero accelerationWikipedia

E.g. you need to be going fast enough to overcome the Earth’s gravitational pull. Or, for startups, you’ve got to have enough momentum and acceleration to break away… There are several components to this, and they don’t all have to be there, but one of them gives you the fuel you need….

1) Lots of funding. This is pretty straight forward – you have cash to do everything fast – and if you really raise a lot of money, implement the King Maker Strategy, e.g. raise so much funding you can guarantee your own success.
2) Office in the US (or plans to have one quickly) – either NYC or SF. Depending on where customers and partners are. This also gets you closer to your most likely acquirers. Keep R&D wherever you have it, and head West.
3) Connections. You need intros and doors to be opened. What’s that you say? “But that’s your job Mr VC to make intros” True, it is, and it’s something that all VCs do to varying extents. But you need your own networks – maybe you’re an ex-Googler or you went to Stanford, Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard or your co-founder did, etc. The old adage “it’s not what you know, it’s who you know” still matters. More than you possibly realize. You can borrow this from your investors, but you need to bring some of your own connections to the party. If you don’t have them, start making them. You will need them.
4) Chutzpah. Use this if you’re short on any of the above. With enough will, charisma, sheer determination and a bit of luck, you can break away. But this one is more of an art, but I have seen it in action – and it’s impressive.

I’m sure there are a few more I could add (great design comes to mind) – and feel free to add any in the comments below.

Hopefully this gives more color on what’s going on inside my head when I’m thinking about an investment…and what you need to make it as an entrepreneur.

Filed under: Entrepreneurship, Europreneurship, Technology, Venture Capital

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