VC Investments: US vs. EU

The U.S.:
“VentureOne reports that the number of deals and amount invested fell 9% and 16%, repectively, from a year ago to 474 deals and $4.6 billion in the first quarter of 2005.” More

The EU:
“According to a new report by Go4Venture, a fund-raising specialist for European technology companies, a sudden jump in the company’s proprietary industry activity indicator shows that the slump in the European venture-capital market has come to an end.” More

I can confirm that London Seed Capital and London Business Angels are significantly busier than last year, which supports the EU case. Anecdotal evidence gathered on a recent trip to Silicon Valley suggests that seed and early stage fundraising in the US is difficult- and that VCs there prefer to support their portfolios, supporting the VentureOne report.

However, the fine print in the VentureOne report suggests otherwise for the early stage market:

Early-stage (US) deals are on the rise. They comprised 32% of all deals in Q1, compared to 30% in Q4. The amount invested in early-stage companies, $235.2 million, was the highest since the fourth quarter of 2000. It seems VCs are wasting no time putting all the new funds they’ve raised to work.

Lies or statistics? I would welcome your comments and feedback.

Kleiner Perkins’ Zazzle.com Investment

One of the “under the radar” businessness listed in this Deal Flow article has me scratching my head:

Zazzle.com — Kleiner Perkins and Google board member Ram Shriram invested $16 million in the series A round of this Menlo Park, Calif. startup, which provides a marketplace for buying and selling custom goods on the Internet. Consumers can use the site to design a custom T-shirt, poster, print, or card and make money every time it sells. Zazzle was founded in 1999 and launched its service in 2003. Kleiner Perkins managing partner John Doerr and Shriram serve on the board.

A $16 million Series A round for a T-shirt site? With all due respect to KPCB, because they deserve it, an investment of this size in this space baffles me. From a London persective, it looks like they’re partying like it’s 1999 over in California.

Kleiner Perkins’ Zazzle.com Investment

One of the “under the radar” businessness listed in this Deal Flow article has me scratching my head:

Zazzle.com — Kleiner Perkins and Google board member Ram Shriram invested $16 million in the series A round of this Menlo Park, Calif. startup, which provides a marketplace for buying and selling custom goods on the Internet. Consumers can use the site to design a custom T-shirt, poster, print, or card and make money every time it sells. Zazzle was founded in 1999 and launched its service in 2003. Kleiner Perkins managing partner John Doerr and Shriram serve on the board.

A $16 million Series A round for a T-shirt site? With all due respect to KPCB, because they deserve it, an investment of this size in this space baffles me. From a London persective, it looks like they’re partying like it’s 1999 over in California.

Kleiner Perkins’ Zazzle.com Investment

One of the “under the radar” businessness listed in this Deal Flow article has me scratching my head:

Zazzle.com — Kleiner Perkins and Google board member Ram Shriram invested $16 million in the series A round of this Menlo Park, Calif. startup, which provides a marketplace for buying and selling custom goods on the Internet. Consumers can use the site to design a custom T-shirt, poster, print, or card and make money every time it sells. Zazzle was founded in 1999 and launched its service in 2003. Kleiner Perkins managing partner John Doerr and Shriram serve on the board.

A $16 million Series A round for a T-shirt site? With all due respect to KPCB, because they deserve it, an investment of this size in this space baffles me. From a London persective, it looks like they’re partying like it’s 1999 over in California.

Apple – Hot News

Thumbs up to my friend CK. He’s on the Apple – Hot News page.

Trent Reznor’s GarageBand Release

“Trent Reznor just did one of the coolest things an artist could do,” writes C.K. Sample, III, for tuaw.com, “and he did so in a specifically Apple-centric way. He released Nine Inch Nails’ new single, The Hand That Feeds, as a 70MB stuffed DMG file containing the entire song in GarageBand format with a note from Trent himself.” [Apr 17, 2005]